Affordable Preventive Pet Care Free Office Visit | No Qualifying | Every Income Level Welcome
16322 Middlebelt Rd. Livonia, MI 48154

Wellness Center

& Pantry 4 Paws

Pet Food Assistance
Call (734) 855-4077
Wellness Center & Pet Food Assistance
Affordable Preventive Pet Care Free Office Visit | No Qualifying | Every Income Level Welcome
16322 Middlebelt Rd. Livonia, MI 48154
Wellness Center & Pet Food Assistance
Call (734) 855-4077

Wellness Center

Preventative Pet Care

Please Note: We are not a full service veterinary clinic

Tail Waggers is proud to offer affordable Preventative Pet Care to EVERY pet owner in ANY community, REGARDLESS of their income level! There is no need to “qualify” for our Wellness Center and our affordable prices for both dog and cat services will help YOU save money! Review our pricing below.

Need vaccines, heartworm or combo testing? Does your pet have flea and/or tick issues? Ears, eyes and skin conditions? General, annual veterinarian medicine is what we do best! Call us today to schedule an appointment and check us out – you’ll be glad you did!

Our Wellness Center schedule changes weekly.
Please call (734) 855-4077 to schedule your appointment today!

Wellness Center

Pricing & Services

Vaccinations are important for the health and well being of dogs and cats of all ages. At Tail Waggers we recognize that every pet is unique and every pet receives an individual vaccine recommendation. We currently offer the following vaccinations and services at our Wellness Center.

Canine Vaccinations

Distemper, Hepatitis and Adenovirus, Parvovirus, Parainfluenza:​

Canine distemper is a highly contagious, potentially fatal viral disease that attacks white blood cells and severely affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems.  The virus is usually transmitted by aerosolized droplets from an infected animal and does not require direct contact.  It is often fatal without aggressive symptomatic treatment.

Canine Parvovirus is shed in the feces and can survive for years in the environment.  It attacks the gastrointestinal system causing severe diarrhea, vomiting, and dehydration. Parvovirus is also frequently fatal with or without aggressive symptomatic treatment.

Canine Hepatitis, Adenovirus, and Parainfluenza are all potentially fatal communicable diseases.

Puppies should receive a series of either 3 or 4 DHPP vaccinations every 3-4 weeks starting at 6-8 weeks of age and ending at 16 weeks of age.   Adults should receive an annual booster starting 1 year after completion of the puppy series.

Puppies older than 16 weeks and unvaccinated adult dogs should receive a series of 2 DHPP vaccines 3-4 weeks apart followed by annual boosters thereafter.

The state of Michigan requires by law that ALL dogs over the age of 16 weeks be vaccinated against Rabies. Rabies is a viral disease that can infect all mammals, including humans, and is 100% fatal. In Michigan the #1 carrier of rabies is the bat. All puppies should be vaccinated at 16 weeks of age and adults should receive an annual booster starting 1 year after the first vaccination. At Tail Waggers 1990 we currently only offer the 1 year rabies vaccine.

A bacterial disease that is spread via contact with the urine of infected animals. In and around the Detroit area, Leptospirosis is mainly spread by rodents, opossums, raccoons, skunks, and deer. It causes severe, acute liver and kidney failure and is often fatal even with aggressive symptomatic treatment. Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease, which means it can be transmitted to humans and causes the same symptoms. We recommend puppies be vaccinated with a series of 2 vaccines at 12 and 16 weeks of age followed by annual boosters thereafter.

Bordetella is the most common bacterial component of the upper respiratory syndrome known as Kennel Cough. It mainly causes upper respiratory symptoms such as severe cough, nasal discharge, and congestion. Cases left untreated can result in pneumonia, which can be fatal. This vaccine is recommended for all dogs that are boarded, groomed outside of the house, in obedience or doggy day care classes, or go to dog parks or dog shows. There are two types of vaccines, an injectable and an intranasal version. The intranasal vaccine is recommended to be given to puppies at least 8 weeks of age in conjunction with a core vaccine and is to be boostered annually. The injectable form is a series of two vaccines 3-4 weeks apart in puppies greater than 8 weeks old followed by an annual booster thereafter.

If your dog is a hunting dog or accompanies you in the woods on camping or hiking trips, if you have a heavily wooded backyard, or if you travel to the west or northern parts of the state, vaccination is highly recommended. Lyme disease is a bacterial disease spread by ticks and is becoming more prevalent in the state of Michigan. Tail Waggers’ keeps a limited supply of the Lyme vaccine in stock.

Zoonotic diseases are diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans and vice versa. The most common zoonoses in pets are parasitic diseases and children seem to be most susceptible. It is highly recommended that all pets have a fecal sample submitted at least once per year for parasite testing.

Roundworms and hookworms are very common parasites of dogs and cats. Virtually all puppies and kittens are infected with roundworm. When transmitted to humans these parasites can cause serious skin, organ, and ocular disease. Roundworms can be transmitted to humans via the fecal-oral route. The eggs hatch in the intestine and the larvae can then migrate to the liver, lungs, brain, eyes, or other organs. Hookworms are transmitted via skin contact with the eggs and can cause skin lesions. It is recommended that all puppies and kittens receive a series of dewormer.

Giardia is also a common intestinal parasite of dogs and cats. It is spread to humans via fecal-oral route and can cause severe, sometimes bloody diarrhea.

Heartworm is a potentially fatal, but easily preventable, parasitic disease of dogs and cats. Dogs are much more severely affected than cats. The parasite is transmitted via mosquitoes and the adults live in the heart and pulmonary arteries. This disease is becoming more prevalent in the state of Michigan. Common signs of heartworm infection include coughing, exercise intolerance, failure to grow, and labored breathing. The severity of the signs is often related to the dog’s activity level and many dogs will show no symptoms at all until the disease is very advanced. Due to the high risk of heartworm disease in our area, we recommend year-round preventative medication and annual heartworm testing for all dogs. Puppies should be started on a heartworm preventative at 8 weeks of age and should remain on a monthly, year-round preventative for the rest of their lives. All dogs should be tested for the disease between 7-10 months of age and annually thereafter. The preventative medication not only prevents heartworms, but treats and protects against multiple intestinal parasites, including round and hook worms.

Dog and cat microchipping is a simple procedure. A veterinarian simply injects a microchip for pets, about the size of a grain of rice (12mm), beneath the surface of your pets skin between the shoulder blades. The process is similar to a routine shot, takes only a few seconds, and your pet will not react any more than he would to a vaccination. No anesthetic is required.

Learn to separate microchipping facts from fiction! Read our Microchipping Fact from Fiction.

Canine Pricing

1 Year Vaccines

Core Packages – $55
Distemper/Parvo, Rabies & Lepto

Wellness Package – $90
Distemper/Parvo, Rabies, Lepto, Bordetella, Heartworm Test

Microchips – $30
Includes Registration

Heartworm Test – $20

Deworming – By Weight

Lyme – $25
Limited Stock

Toe Nail Trim
Adult Dog – $15 \ Puppy – $5

All Single Vaccines – $20

*To help keep our prices low, A ONE TIME, New Patient Fee of $15.00 is charged. All prices are subject to change & may be different at Community Vaccination Clinics.

Feline Vaccinations

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, and Panleukopenia

Feline Rhinotracheitis and Calicivirus can cause mild to severe upper respiratory disease, eye infections, and oral ulcerations in cats. Cases left untreated can lead to severe pneumonia. Kittens are especially susceptible. It is spread thru direct contact and aerosolized secretions.

Feline Panleukopenia/Distemper is a highly contagious, potentially fatal viral disease that attacks the gastrointestinal and immune systems. Symptoms include severe vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration. This disease is often fatal unless treated early.

Kittens should receive a series of either 3 or 4 FVRCP vaccinations every 3-4 weeks starting at 6-8 weeks of age and ending at 16 weeks of age. Adults should receive an annual booster starting 1 year after completion of the kitten series.

Kittens older than 16 weeks and unvaccinated adult cats should receive a series of 2 FVRCP vaccines 3-4 weeks apart followed by annual boosters thereafter.

Although rabies vaccination for cats is not required by state law, it is still considered a core vaccine and all kittens and cats, even ones that are strictly indoor, should be vaccinated. Rabies is a viral disease that can infect all mammals, including humans, and is 100% fatal. In Michigan the #1 carrier of rabies is the bat. All kittens should be vaccinated at 16 weeks of age and adults should receive an annual booster starting 1 year after the first vaccination. At Tail Waggers 1990 we currently only offer the 1 year rabies vaccine.

This is a viral disease that attacks the immune system making it impossible for infected cats to fight off even small infections. Saliva to blood (biting) is generally accepted as the primary source of spreading the virus . Although infected cats can live healthy lives for years the virus will eventually be fatal. Infected cats often show no outward symptoms but are continuously shedding the virus. We recommend that all kittens, regardless of their housing situation, be tested for FeLV, then upon a negative result, be vaccinated twice at 12 and 16 weeks of age. If the kitten will be an indoor only cat one booster is recommended a year after the initial vaccine series. If the cat will be going outdoors then the FeLV vaccine should be boostered yearly.

Zoonotic diseases are diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans and vice versa. The most common zoonoses in pets are parasitic diseases and children seem to be most susceptible. It is highly recommended that all pets have a fecal sample submitted at least once per year for parasite testing.

Roundworms and hookworms are very common parasites of dogs and cats. Virtually all puppies and kittens are infected with roundworm. When transmitted to humans these parasites can cause serious skin, organ, and ocular disease. Roundworms can be transmitted to humans via the fecal-oral route. The eggs hatch in the intestine and the larvae can then migrate to the liver, lungs, brain, eyes, or other organs. Hookworms are transmitted via skin contact with the eggs and can cause skin lesions. It is recommended that all puppies and kittens receive a series of dewormer.

Giardia is also a common intestinal parasite of dogs and cats. It is spread to humans via fecal-oral route and can cause severe, sometimes bloody diarrhea.

Both cats and dogs need to be microchipped. Cats often do not wear collars, and may not have any other form of ID. A recent study showed that less than 2% of cats without microchips were returned home. However, if a cat is microchipped, the return-to-owner rate is 20 times higher than if the cat was not microchipped.

It is a simple procedure. A veterinarian simply injects a microchip for pets, about the size of a grain of rice (12mm), beneath the surface of your pets skin between the shoulder blades. The process is similar to a routine shot, takes only a few seconds, and your pet will not react any more than he would to a vaccination. No anesthetic is required.

Learn to separate microchipping facts from fiction! Read our Microchipping Fact from Fiction.

Feline Pricing

1 Year Vaccines

Indoor Package – $37
Rabies, Distemper (FVRCP)

Outdoor Package – $60
Rabies, Distemper (FVRCP), Feline Leukemia

FeLV/FIC Combo Test – $30

Microchips – $30
Includes Registration

Deworming – By Weight

Toe Nail Trim
Adult Cats – $10 \ Kitten – $5

All Single Vaccines – $20

*To help keep our prices low, A ONE TIME, New Patient Fee of $15.00 is charged. All prices are subject to change & may be different at Community Vaccination Clinics.

Wellness Center Schedule

Preventive Care for Your Dog or Cat

Please call (734) 855-4077 to schedule your appointment today! View our calendar to see upcoming Wellness Center days/times and Community Vaccination Clinics near you.   This calendar is updated when dates are confirmed- check back often!